THE CONVERSATION

“THE CONVERSATION” Episode #48, With Dale Scott, Former Major League Baseball Umpire

April 16, 2020

Dale Scott Redemption - Referee.com
Photo: From Daily Beast

Dale Scott began umpiring at age 15 and entered the minor leagues in 1981, eventually working his way up to the Triple-A American Association. He umpired a single major league game during the 1985 MLB season, making his debut in an August 19 game between the Kansas City Royals and Detroit Tigers.  Scott became a full-time MLB umpire in 1986, working 116 games that season. Scott worked a total of 3,897 regular season games, 91 post-season games, and issued 90 ejections in his MLB career.

Dale umpired in the World Series in 1998, 2001 and 2004, in the All-Star Game in 1993, 2001, and 2011, calling balls and strikes. He has also worked in six League Championship Series (1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2009, 2013) and in twelve Division Series (1995, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2014, 2015).

When the AL introduced red shirts in 1996, he frequently was the only umpire to wear the color, rather than the usual navy blue. He almost always wore the red shirt when working home plate, including Game 3 of the 1998 World Series at Qualcomm Stadium.

Dale worked his last game on April 14, 2017, in Toronto. In the 8th inning he was struck in the mask and was carted off the field with a concussion and whiplash. This was Scott’s fourth concussion in five years, his second in nine months. After consulting with several sports medicine and concussion specialists, Scott decided not to return, and announced his retirement in December 2017.

Dale worked as a radio personality at KBDF, a Top 40 station in Eugene, Oregon, in the late 1970s. He is an avid Oregon Ducks football fan and often attends games at Autzen Stadium when given the opportunity.

Dale came out as gay in 2014, thus becoming the first openly gay umpire in MLB, and is married to Michael Rausch, whom he met at CC Slaughters in Portland in October 1986.

In 2015, he was inducted into the National Gay and Lesbian Sports Hall of Fame, and to the Hall of Honor at Sheldon High School in his hometown of Eugene.

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