DELAWARE FIRST STATE ROLLING OUT LEGALIZE BETTING

Delaware Gov. John Carney holds a $10 bill he used to place the first bet at Dover Downs Casino on Tuesday in Dover, Del. Delaware is the first state to launch legal sports betting since a Supreme Court decision allowed states to legalize such gambling. Mark Makela/Getty Images

On Tuesday, Delaware became the first state to take advantage of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision and legalize full-scale sports betting — with the governor first in line to lay down money on a single game. Gov. John Carney put $10 on the Phillies game that night — and it paid off. The Phillies beat the Cubs 6-1.

In this May 14, 2018, file photo, men watch horse racing on an array of screens at Monmouth Park Racetrack in Oceanport, N.J. New Jersey lawmakers are facing some key decisions Monday, June 4, as they race to legalize sports betting after winning a case in the U.S. Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Full-scale sports betting is coming to Delaware, barely three weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for states to implement wagering schemes.

Gov. John Carney planned to join other state officials Tuesday afternoon at Dover Downs for the launch of sports betting at Delaware’s three casinos, which will offer single-game and championship wagering on professional baseball, football, hockey, basketball, soccer, golf and auto racing. By RANDALL CHASE AND BEN NUCKOLS

 

On a day without an NBA Finals game or Stanley Cup Final matchup, there was still plenty of betting action when Delaware opened for business Tuesday. According to Vernon Kirk, director of the state lottery, $322,135 was bet on sports at Delaware’s three casinos Tuesday, the first day the state offered a full menu of betting options. By David Purdum

Delaware is officially giving Las Vegas a run for its money. On Tuesday afternoon, the small state on the Eastern Seaboard began offering full-scale sports betting, making it the first state to take advantage of the Supreme Court’s decision last month to strike down a 1992 federal law that banned commercial sports betting in most states. By Maya Salam

(Photo: Suchat Pederson, The News Journal)

London, England, imagine it is five years from now, and you’re walking across the parking lot at a shopping center, perhaps to collect some dry cleaning or a quart of milk. On your way back to the car – no, it won’t be driving itself to collect you at the curbside yet – you’re distracted by a sign advertising the weekend’s NFL games, and how you can profit from them. It is a gambling office, where you wager on sports just as easily as plucking groceries from a shelf. By , USA TODAY

 

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